2017 marks an exciting milestone for Fieldwork! We are celebrating our 10th anniversary this year with Soundwork - an exhibition of 6 new installations that incorporate sound. We hope you will journey out this season with friends and family to experience the diverse ways that artists think about, and use sound in their creative work at Fieldwork.

 

Soundwork: Opens Saturday, May 13. 2-5pm.

An afternoon of artists' talks, a tour, performances and workshops.

INSTALLATIONS BY:

Mixed Metaphors (Jesse Stewart & Matt Edwards)

Hilary Martin & Ranjit Bhatnagar

Annette Hegel & Deborah Margo

Matt Rogalsky & Laura Cameron

Doug Van Nort

Nicola Oddy

 

Schedule:

2pm - Opening remarks. Artist introductions

2:30 - Singwalk (with Diana Smith for Nicola Oddy)

3:00 - Listening workshop (with Doug Van Nort)

3:30 - Castorimba Performance (with Gayle Young, Reinhard Reitzenstein)

4:00 - Performance of Erratic Grass (with Mixed Metaphors - Jesse Stewart and Matt Edwards)

4:30 - refreshments/wrap up

 

Explore art in nature along our field and forest trails. Fieldwork is open to the public all year long, free of charge. This exhibiton as well as many ongoing installations from previous years are yours to discover.

 

More information about this year's installations will be posted on the website and on our social media channels in the coming weeks so please follow us and share our pages with your friends.  Facebook, Twitter and Instagram

 

  

Fieldwork has been funded by the Ontario Arts Council since 2008.  We also rely on the generosity of our supporters. We appreciate donations of any size.  Please contact us if you would like to discuss donating.


 

ABOUT US:

Fieldwork  is open to the public daily, all year and free of charge.  Just park and walk.
Note: Please remember that it is a natural setting and there are bugs (including ticks).  Be sure to dress accordingly and cover up.
Directions to the project are
here.

Since its inception in 2008, Fieldwork has been run by a team of artists (The Collective) that volunteer their time and energy to make Fieldwork a vibrant and dynamic destination for the creation and experience of site-specific artwork in and around a field in eastern Ontario, close to the towns of Perth and Maberly.

Fieldwork hosts work by local, national and international artists at various stages of their careers and invites the public to visit and explore the artwork all year long. 

The Collective looks after the site, co-ordinates and promotes projects, shares administrative duties and makes joint curatorial decisions. From time to time the Collective members also create their own Fieldwork installations.

The Fieldwork Collective welcomes proposals from interested artists and circulates a public call for proposals annually in January.  Suggestions and proposals for events or workshops are also welcomed from the local community, schools and arts organizations that are interested in fostering connections, dialogue and creative action between people, art, and nature. Please contact us at fieldworkproject@gmail.com

More information on current and past installations can be found by scrolling down this page and/or by looking in the archives in the right hand menu.  Be sure to also check out additional photos of the installations - found in the galleries located in the right hand menu.

susie osler - Mar 28, 2017
fieldwork 2014 - cuerden kraenzle - monument to the book

Speaking Volumes: A Monument to the Book is a joint installation for FIELDWORK 2014, by artists Karina Kraenzle and Barbara Cuerden.

The work is about stillness, and interiority, the kind that is particular to the book. In an era where bookishness seems to be disappearing, Speaking Volumes is a testament to the internal voice and its absence - and the persistent beauty of the material object - being slowly returned to its source.

The structure is a sentinel made of books, in a small glade in the pine forest at FIELDWORK.  The free-standing structure is accompanied by fragments torn from the books themselves. Words and phrases are suspended from surrounding trees, like nearly perceptible whispers.

More about Speaking Volumes can be found at the artists' project blog: http://stillvoices.weebly.com/

 

 

 

susie osler - May 21, 2014
Fieldwork - Whip-poor-will installation by Cresky, Walter and Osler

Whip-poor-will is a collaborative effort between artists Marc Walter (Wakefield), Lisa Creskey (Chelsea) and Susie Osler (Maberly).  They created it over 3 days of sourcing materials - branches, logs and material on-site that were the 'refuse' from winter cleanup at FIELDWORK mixed with layers of rotten hay and leaves.  The installation includes a large ceramic whip-poor-will by Cresky, and over 100 small white, seed-embedded, unfired clay moths by Osler placed within the 'nest' - that are meant to be 'distribtuted' around the site by visitors.  The nest is built to human scale - encouraging people to enter and 'feel' like a whip-poor-will might - camoflaged by its surrounding sanctuary or startled by the intrusion of others.  

The nest is located on the verge between the field and forest - a place symbolically situated between the 'cultured' (field), and wild' (forest).  Verges as we know are places that often host great diversity of life, or perhaps creativity...

The whip-poor-will is a rare bird in some parts of Ontario.  At FIELDWORK we are lucky to have a perfect habitat for these birds and each year they return to haunt us with their evening and dawn mantra..."Whip-poor-will-whip-poor-will-whip-poor-will-whip-poor-will-whip-poor-will-whip-poor-will...."

Whip-poor-will  will remain here permanently.  Next spring the artists plan to cover the entire structure with more forest debris, soil and hay and plant into it - in the hopes that over time it will break down, contributing habitat to the local flora and fauna.  The installation is, in effect, an example of Hugelkultur meeting art...   And one of art that works in and with the land - taking both inspiration and materials from the site and cycling them creatively into a new form that hopefully leaves a positive footprint on the landscape and the imagination.
 

susie osler - May 21, 2014

With 2 weeks to go before the opening of our 2014 exhibition, things are heating up around the field.  Spring has arrived in its full glory. After a long dormancy the poplars are just beginning to blush verdant green, the pin cherries are blossoming, the field is greening up fast and the air is rich with the layered and looping song of frogs and birds. Artists too are making their way to FIELDWORK, enlivening spaces within the landscape with their creative activities. 

Five new installations are being built in the few weeks before the opening on May 24th.  Here are a couple of pics of the first two as they evolve within the landscape.  The collaboration between Barbara Cuerden and Karina Kraenzle, Speaking Volumes: A Monument to the Book and Whip-poor-will, a collaboration between Marc Walter, Lisa Cresky and Susie Osler.

speaking volumes in process

 

 

 

 

 

 

whip-poor-will in process
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

susie osler - May 11, 2014
susie osler - (re)seed (re)seen - 2014 - RIA project room - reseeded flower

Photo: Unfired ceramic flower from (Re)Seed/(Re)Seen installation at RIA Project Room (Ottawa). Visitor took flower from installation and placed it in a location that needed some life.

 

I was invited this winter to participate in an interesting group show curated by Petra Halkes at RIA's Project Room.  The show, called Never Forever, gathered together work by 6 artists that, as Halkes states,  '[spoke] with empathy of heroic human efforts to hold on to things, to create unchanging systems, to imagine an order that lasts forever.'

My contribution to Never Forever was a re-imagining of the ceramic installation (Re)Seed I presented at the 2011 New Art Festival in Ottawa (find it in the menu to the right for more info)

More on this latest iteration of the installation -  (Re)Seed/(Re)Seen - is here

susie osler - May 1, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mayflies are fitting symbol for spring. The adult's sole purpose in life is to mate - talk about "spring fever"!  Their mouths are sealed shut when they emerge from their water-born naiad to adulthood phase - during which all energy is expended in their one-day flying orgy!  The delicate  beauty they exhibit in this stage is as short lived as it is exquisite.

I chose to create their form in recycled panel board for my Spring installation Ephemeroptera at FIELDWORK this year. This installation consists of fake wood panel boards transformed into mayflies which hang in their final metamorphoses on a tree on a knoll behind the field. To the left is a rocking chair made of astroturf plugged into a nearby tree, providing FIELDWORK visitors a naturally powered and comfortable view through the trees to the wetlands below. Manufactured nature in a natural setting is a tricky contrast and on close inspection reveals much.
Carpe Diem!

- Erin Robertson

erin robertson - Aug 6, 2013
FIELDWORK 2013 - LAURA HALE - REPOSE - GUERILLA MAGAZINE ARTICLE

(Photo by Alexandre Lauzon)

Super article by Tony Martins in the current Issue #36 of Guerilla Magazine (just out today) on Laura Hale's installation 'Repose' at FIELDWORK this year.

Thanks Tony Martins and photographer Alexandre Lauzon!

If you haven't seen this magazine before check it out!
Here's the link:
http://www.getguerilla.ca/index.php/issue-36-feature-2-laura-hale

susie osler - Jul 26, 2013