October 2009

MISCELLANEOUS THOUGHTS (Fifth Posting) Hares & Squares

Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates

Miscellaneous Thoughts (Fifth Posting) hares & squares

 
We will be visiting the installation this Thanksgiving weekend and then off to the family cottage for a traditional Sunday dinner on our way to returning home to Toronto.
 
We’ve had some time to separate ourselves from the work and it will be interesting to get re-acquainted with perhaps a more objective viewpoint.
 
This posting includes a few more images we thought are interesting. We had posted a view from centre field previously and from there all the elements appear green. The idea was that the green leads us toward and across the road, the boundary we wanted to challenge.
 
The hares appear all orange and the squares all green in the view approaching from the east along the road. This is reversed when approaching from the west.
 
We knew we wanted to install the hares and squares along two gentle converging arcs but we were not sure about the exact location or layout. We had been asked if we would mind if another artwork, Heavenly Blue, a terra cotta warrior (soldier) installed during the spring season, remained in place for part of the time that our work was installed. Not only did we not mind, but we looked forward to the challenge of engaging with another element in the field since we believe that if we embrace an uncontrolled, complex array of relationships, that makes our lives, if not our work, more interesting.
 
When we arrived at the site for the installation, and not knowing the location of the soldier, we decided to align the hares with the soldier while allowing the soldier to stand proudly on its own. The two pieces relate well, and many visitors have actually thought that there was an intentional relationship from the conceptual beginnings, but of course there was not.
 
It seems to be the unexpected that confronts us with challenges and brings us delight. The process of creation seems to strengthen when we embrace the unknown rather than fearing it.

REFLECTIONS (Sixth and Final Posting) hares & squares

Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates
Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates


REFLECTIONS (Sixth and Final Posting) hares & squares

 

We visited the installation on Thanksgiving weekend.

 

We recalled after the installation that we had taken a number of photos and then we drove off leaving the work to stand on its own. We were surprisingly quite tearful. I think we had become quite attached to the bunny shapes that we had cut out, and in our minds we had given them life and perhaps even personified them.

 

And yes, despite our informed understanding that they were not bunny rabbits, but hares, we refer to them as bunnies just like everyone else does.

 

Our didactic intent of identifying the shapes as hares that are not native is almost lost in notions of cute, if not cool, but not totally. A local paper, the Frontenac News, by total coincidence included a reporter’s discussion about hares as an alien species in the very same July 9th issue that the fieldwork project was featured in with a mention of the hares & squares project. So for that moment in time, in the Land O’ Lakes region of Ontario, there was arguably a serendipitous convergence of environmental awareness.

 

Our return to the installation was unceremonious. The intensity during the construction and installation had dissipated, the passion for the ideas have now carried on, the project now just a marker of our feelings at a certain time in our lives.

 

Plywood cutouts are not like family and friends or even the growing and living landscapes that we create or nature that we exist in. These are relationships that evolve and strengthen with time. Plywood cutouts are just inanimate things that can embody feelings and ideas that others might engage with, enjoy and learn from but they are static by comparison to living things.

 

What was remarkable, however, was that during the afternoon we spent in the field, about 50 cars drove by and most slowed down or stopped. The people in the cars all seemed to find great joy in the installation. Some got out of their cars to read the interpretive signs and thought out loud about the conceptual basis for the work. Many people took the time to photograph the installation and those more serious worked hard to get that perfect shot. Interestingly, the unapparent complexity of the work makes it difficult to photograph in its entirety at any given time since its configuration and orientation with respect to the sun and other elements poses challenges. It is this complexity that perhaps promotes a deeper engagement after the initial meeting with hares and squares.

 

The project is temporary and will be removed in the next few weeks. It will be displaced by more artwork that animates the field and the experiences of those that pass by. Even more so for those who are lucky enough to visit longer and engage more deeply with the field. It has been an interesting experience to create something that is knowingly transient. We tend to think of our work as permanent, even though we realize that everything, including ourselves, is always changing and by nature impermanent.

 

And accepting this has perhaps being the best lesson. The great joy and lesson in creating this project derives from realizing that we can and must channel our full and positive energy and passion into any experience, even if we are cognizant of its temporary nature.

 

But a greater joy was in sharing the fieldwork/ hares & squares experience with family, with friends, with the fieldwork collective and especially with the wonderful coordinator and curator, Susie Osler.

 

We trust this joy has been contagious!

 

Namaste! Godspeed!

 

Barbara & Real

Hares & Squares (featured in Professional Design Journal)

Hares & Squares- Eguchi Associates

HARES & SQUARES featured in GROUND 07, Landscape Architect Quarterly

The fieldwork summer 2009 art installation hares & sqaures is featured in the Fall 2009 issue of Ground 07, Landscape Architect Quarterly.

This is a publication of the Ontario Association of Landscape Architects.

The website for the OALA is www.oala.ca.